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Advanced Glaucoma Surgery

Advanced Glaucoma Surgery

If you have angle-closure glaucoma, your doctor may perform laser iridotomy to restore normal fluid flow and eye pressure. This laser creates a hole in the iris to improve the flow of aqueous fluid to the drain and is usually made in the upper part of the iris to avoid any visible scarring. You may return to your normal activities after the procedure. For additional information, ask you doctor about the laser irdotomy procedure.

Source: American Academy of Ophthalmology

The most common type of laser surgery performed for open angle glaucoma is called Argon Laser Trabeculoplasty, or A.L.T. A.L.T. is often recommended when eye drops cannot control pressure and the progression of glaucoma.

In A.L.T., an argon laser makes tiny, evenly spaced burns in the trabecular meshwork, the thin sponge-like drainage area of the eye. The procedure is performed on an out-patient basis and can usually be completed within 15-20 minutes. Patients may need to continue taking some glaucoma medications after A.L.T. There is usually little pain associated with the laser procedure and few complications. For more information, ask your doctor about the A.L.T. procedure.

Source: American Academy of Ophthalmology

The newest laser surgical option for treatment of open-angle glaucoma is called selective laser trabeculoplasty or S.L.T. During the S.L.T. procedure, your doctor directs a low frequency laser beam into the trabecular meshwork, which is the primary drainage region of the eye. The S.L.T. laser selectively treats specific cells leaving untreated portions of the trabecular meshwork intact. The procedure increases drainage of fluid out of the eye, resulting in lowered pressure in the eye. After the procedure, the patient is typically treated with anti-inflammatory eye drops for a few days and most resume normal activities within a few days. For more information, ask your doctor about the S.L.T. procedure.

Source: American Academy of Ophthalmology

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